Program

The program is still in development - follow @MSFHR and check back frequently for program updates!

MONDAY, MAY 7

Join us from 5:30 to 9:00 pm for a Satellite Event Health xChange 2018, an evening of storytelling with PechaKucha. This year, Health xChange asks: How can we mobilize research evidence to make change in health policy or practice?  

TUESDAY, MAY 8

 

6:00 - 8:00 pm

Conference Registration & Welcome Reception

 Welcome Remarks from Conference Chairs:
 
  • Perry Kendall, Former Provincial Health Officer, British Columbia
  • Elinor Wilson, Board Chair, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.
 British Consulate-General Vancouver:
 
  • Nicole Davison, British Consul General in Vancouver
British_Consulate_General.png

Reception Sponsor: British Consulate General Vancouver


WEDNESDAY, MAY 9

7:30 - 8:30 am

Registration & Breakfast

8:30 - 8:45 am

Welcome by Conference Chair(s) and Hosts

 
  • Perry Kendall, Former Provincial Health Officer, British Columbia
  • Eugene Milne, Director of Public Health for Newcastle, Deputy Chair of the Fuse Strategy Board (UK)
  • Elinor Wilson, Board Chair, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.
  • Bev Holmes, President & CEO, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (On behalf of co-hosts)

8:45 - 10:30 am
 

A Global View of Knowledge Exchange in Public Health Policy Making

 This distinguished opening panel will explore the use of evidence in public health policymaking in Canada, Australia, Israel, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands to discover what’s working, what’s not, and what the trends, issues, and policy-related challenges are across jurisdictions and sectors.
 Facilitator: Gregory Taylor, Former Chief Public Health Officer of Canada
 Panelists:
 
  • Moriah Ellen, Senior Lecturer, Ben Gurion University (Israel)
  • Steven Hoffman, Scientific Director, Institute of Population and Public Health (Canada)
  • Jantine Schuit, Dean, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University (Netherlands)
  • Sarah Thackway, Associate Professor; Executive Director, Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Health Leadership Executive, the Australian Partnership Prevention Centre. (Australia)

10:30 - 11:00 am

Break & Poster Viewing

11:00 am - 12:00 pm
 

Plenary Panel: Critical Role of Evidence in a Public Health Emergency

 Declaring a public health emergency triggers a sequence of activities and protocols designed to prevent, protect against, respond to and recover from whatever emergency has put public health at risk. Using a case-based approach, this session will look at the impact of a public health crisis on mobilizing evidence - how is evidence used, differences across jurisdictions, lessons learned, and whether the changes made during a crisis have an enduring effect.
 Facilitator: Rhonda Low, Family Physician, Copeman Healthcare Centre; TV & Radio Journalist
 Panelists:
 
  • Clay Adams, Vice President, Communications and Public Affairs, Vancouver Coastal Health (Canada)
  • Perry Kendall, Former Provincial Health Officer, British Columbia
  • Danuta SkowronskiPhysician Epidemiologist, BCCDC; Clinical Professor, School of Population & Public Health, University of British Columbia (Canada)

12:00 - 1:00 pm

Lunch

1:00 - 2:20 pm

Concurrent Sessions: Workshops and Oral Presentations

 
Workshop 1:
Room: TBC
 
 
An Executive Summary is not Enough: Innovative reports for public health
Kylie Hutchinson
 
Workshop 2:
Room: TBC
 
 
Theorizing Trust Mechanisms in Collaborative and Co-Productive Public Health Contexts: A Realist Methodology Open Forum
Justin Jagosh
 
 
Oral Abstract Presentation 1:
Room: TBC
  Theme: Partnerships Between Researchers and Policy Makers
 
Taking the Deliberative Dialogue Model on the Road: supporting and evaluating a system-led improvement approach in the North East of England
Peter van der Graaf
 
  The Evolution of the Articulation of Organizational and Collective Interests in a Deliberative Process
Achille Dadly Borvil
 
  TBA
 
  Sustainable Partnerships between Researchers and Policymakers in Public Health: what makes them work?
Ien van de Goor
 
Oral Abstract Presentations 2:
Room: TBC
  Theme: Practice-based Evidence
 
Dissemination of evidence based policy research through national partners
Shelby Lautner
 
  The CollaboraKTion framework for community-based knowledge translation: A data-driven and theoretically informed approach to population-focused
Emily Jenkins
 
  Theme: Partnerships Between Researchers and Policy Makers
 
Frayme: Addressing youth mental health system fragmentation through an international knowledge mobilization network
Meriem Benlamri & Warren Helfrich
 
  Theme: Practice-based Evidence
 
Integrated Knowledge Translation and Disseminating Action-Oriented & Equity-Focused Research Findings
Sana Shahram
 
Oral Abstract Presentations 3:
Room: TBC
  Theme: Communicating Evidence
 
Knowledge Brokering: An organizational strategy to support evidence-informed public health
Maureen Dobbins
 
  Tools to Translate: supporting evidence-informed policymaking in a partnership model of research
Helen Signy
 
  Social Media as a Knowledge Translation Tool to Disseminate High-quality Public Health Evidence
Maureen Dobbins
 
  Advancing Research Impact: Pathways to communicate the right information to the right policy maker at the right time
Maxi Miciak

2:20 - 2:45 pm

Break & Poster Viewing

2:45 - 4:05 pm

Concurrent Sessions: Workshops and Oral Presentations

 
Workshop 3:
Room: TBC
 
 
How to Develop a Structural Approach to Knowledge Exchange? Practice-based Workshop on Effectively Linking Communication Activities Between Researchers
Oliver Francis, Peter van der Graaf & Mark Welford
 
Workshop 4:
Room: TBC
 
 
Closing the Loop between Life Scientists and Policy Makers: lessons learned from developing policy frameworks for substance use
Julienne Jagdeo, Ron Joe, Conny Lin & Kenneth Tupper
 
 
Oral Abstract Presentation 4:
Room: TBC
  Theme: Partnerships Between Researchers and Policy Makers
 
Home and Healthy Ageing: co-production of a research agenda
Philip Hodgson
 
  Partnerships - How is Health Research Used in Indigenous Communities
Patrick Odnokon
 
  Let's INTERACT - Mobilizing data, cities, and citizens for evidence and action on healthy, equitable cities
Meredith Sones
 
  'Embedded' Scholarship as a Strategy for Health Equity Policy Change
Sana Shahram
 
Oral Abstract Presentation 5:
Room: TBC
  Theme: Economic Evidence
 
Creating a Compelling Case for Prevention by Combining Health Economics, Systems Thinking and Dynamic Simulation Modelling
Paul Crosland
 
  Theme: Practice-based Evidence
 
Informal Knowledge Management Systems: a unique ethnography to help policy makers ‘listen close’ to public health practitioners monitoring their practice
Abeera Shahid
 
  Theme: Diversity in Public Health Policy
 
Engaging Patients as Partners in Health Research and Policy-making
Rebecca Barnes, Bernie Paul & TBA
 
  Theme: Practice-based Evidence
 
The Magic of Listening to Stakeholders for Achieving Impact: using stakeholder engagement and KT planning
David Phipps & Anneleise Poetz

4:10 - 5:15 pm
 

Plenary: Why Doesn't Evidence Inform Policy Making Quite the Way we Hope?

 Facilitator: Emily Jenkins, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
 Paul Cairney, Professor of Politics and Public Policy in the Department of History and Politics at the University of Stirling (United Kingdom), will lead a provocative end-of-day session on what does and doesn’t work in evidence-informed policy making and why. This session will explore the conditions necessary for evidence to win the day, how policies on prevention rarely meet those conditions, and being realistic about the limitations or how far evidence will take us.

Dr. Cairney’s presentation will be followed by commentary from respondents and questions from the audience.

 Respondents:  
 
  • Moriah Ellen, Senior Lecturer, Ben Gurion University (Israel)
  • Marjorie MacDonald, School of Nursing, University of Victoria; Scientist, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research (Canada)
  • Sarah Thackway, Associate Professor; Executive Director, Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Health Leadership Executive, the Australian Partnership Prevention Centre. (Australia)

5:30 - 7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception


THURSDAY, MAY 10

7:30 - 8:30 am

Breakfast & Welcome Day 2

8:30 - 9:15 am

Lightning Talks: Evidence to Action

 Facilitator: Geoffrey W. Payne, Vice President Research & Graduate Programs University of Northern BC
 Researchers and decision makers take the main stage for five minutes each to share experiences in knowledge exchange intended to support the uptake of evidence in the decision making process.
  • Towards evidence-informed health system policy design in Nova Scotia - Krista Connell
  • Communication of clinical research lab blood mercury results back to study participants as a method to inform patients, health providers and policy-makers’ decisions about environmental metal exposures among East Asian newcomer women in Vancouver, BC - Linda Dix-Cooper & James Lu
  • Commitment issues: Lessons learned from working in an integrated knowledge translation (IKT) partnership - Heather Gainforth & Chris McBride
  • The balancing act for opioid strategy: Policy researchers’ views versus policy users’ perspectives - Mary Clare Zak & John Millar

9:15 - 10:00 am
 

Plenary: Changing the Narrative on Investment in Population and Public Health Research

 Facilitator: Bonnie Henry, Provincial Health Officer, British Columbia
 Steven Hoffman, Scientific Director, Institute of Population and Public Health (Canada)
Governments around the world vastly underinvest in public health and public health research. While healthcare budgets continue to grow, funding has remained stagnant for prevention and population level solutions. The preventative nature of public health research compounds the challenge of showcasing the value and impact of research to decision-makers. However, in an age of globalization and new technologies, public health researchers are uniquely positioned to work across sectors, amplify the impact of basic science research, and implement and evaluate preventative health solutions. Only by highlighting these strengths and demonstrating the effectiveness of public health research can the case for increased investment be made. Steven Hoffman, Scientific Director of the Institute of Population and Public Health discusses the importance of building an investment case for public health research using examples from of infectious disease, chronic disease, and human behaviours.

10:00 - 10:30 am

Break & Poster Viewing

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Plenary: How Healthy is Public Health Policy?

 What is healthy public policy both in terms of how it is developed and in the end result? This session will discuss the constraints on evidence-informed policy making for elected officials, bureaucrats, and service delivery organizations. Providing the right evidence, incenting the right decisions, managing conflicting Interests, and reaching consensus.
 Facilitator: Shannon Turner, Executive Director, Public Health Association of BC (PHABC)
 Opening Commentary:
 
  • Trevor Hancock, Senior Scholar, School of Public Health and Social Policy, University of Victoria (Canada)
 Panelists:
  • Nadav Davidovitch, Director, School of Public Health, Ben Gurion University (Israel)
  • Colleen McGavin, Patient Engagement Lead, BC SUPPORT Unit (Canada)
  • Eugene Milne, Director of Public Health at Newcastle City Council, UK and Fuse (England)
  • Mark Tyndall, Executive Medical Director, BC Centre for Disease Control; Professor of Medicine, University of British Columbia (Canada)

12:00 - 1:50 pm

Lunch & Final Keynote: If We Want More Evidence-Based Practice or Policy, We Need More Practice-based Evidence

 Facilitator: Marjorie MacDonald, School of Nursing, University of Victoria; Scientist, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research
 Lawrence Green, University of California, San Francisco (USA)
As the evidence-based medicine movement evolved, it increasingly looked at population health questions of efficacy, cost-effectiveness and efficiency. Over time, the criteria of effectiveness have been stretched to include considerations of external validity. This has meant asking whether the practices from highly controlled and often randomized trials could be broadly applied in varied settings, circumstances and populations. Dr. Green will draw these historical threads together to bring us to the conclusion of this conference with questions and suggestions of how to improve the fit among policy, research evidence and practice. Further, how can policy do this without imposing impossible requirements and unrealistic criteria of effectiveness on the varied settings in which evidence and policy are applied?

1:50 - 2:00 pm

Closing Remarks